‘Green Dot Week’ builds awareness of sexual assault prevention

Juniors Winona Mantelli (far left), Kaitlin McDonagh (center) and James O'Connor proudly don Green Dot gear to cheer on the Camels at the third annual Green Dot Hockey Game. Scroll down to see more photos from Green Dot Week.
Juniors Winona Mantelli (far left), Kaitlin McDonagh (center) and James O'Connor proudly don Green Dot gear to cheer on the Camels at the third annual Green Dot Hockey Game. Scroll down to see more photos from Green Dot Week.

Connecticut College’s official colors might be blue and white, but last week, the campus was a sea of green.

Students donned T-shirts emblazoned with large green dots, the men’s hockey team wore special green jerseys to take on Tufts and the College’s camel mascot was spotted sporting – you guessed it – green. The College community was celebrating “Green Dot Week,” a series of events and activities to raise awareness for the College’s violence prevention program, Green Dot.

Through the program, students, faculty and staff are trained to help prevent power-based personal violence, including sexual violence, domestic violence, dating violence and stalking. A "Green Dot" is defined as any behavior, choice, word, or attitude that counters or displaces a "red dot" of violence, promoting safety for everyone and communicating utter intolerance for sexual violence, interpersonal violence and stalking. More than 500 students, faculty and staff members have been trained. 

"Connecticut College is on the forefront of addressing issues of sexual violence with well-developed education and prevention programs and comprehensive services and resources for students who have experienced sexual assault," said Dean of the College Carolyn Denard. "The popularity of the Green Dot program is one of the many ways Connecticut College stands out."

Connecticut College adopted the national training program as part of the College’s broader Think S.A.F.E. Project. Originally developed and funded in 2010 through a three-year, $300,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Justice's Office on Violence Against Women, the Think S.A.F.E. Project is managed by Darcie Folsom, director of sexual violence prevention and advocacy, and addresses sexual assault, dating violence and stalking by integrating prevention and response training and education into the campus culture, building a community coalition and enhancing victim services. When the three-year Department of Justice grant work was completed in 2013, the College took on this important commitment with support from College funds, and named Folsom to her current position.

For more on Green Dot Week, see the coverage in New London's The Day and on Fox CT.  



February 11, 2014
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Heidi Halsted '15 (left) and Rebecca Raymond '14 rock Green Dot T-shirts and pose with green pucks at the third annual Green Dot Hockey Game. Photos by Jordan Thomas '15.

Green Dot Week included a trivia night, information sessions and a social media campaign and culminated with the hockey game Saturday and a six-hour training session for students Sunday.

Students give out Green Dot swag to fans at Saturday's hockey game. The annual event raises awareness for the Green Dot program, in which students, faculty and staff are trained to help prevent power-based personal violence, including sexual violence, domestic violence, dating violence and stalking.

For the second consecutive year, the men's hockey team took to the ice in special Green Dot uniforms. "It's great to wear the jersey and play this game for the Green Dot program, but it's even better to be involved, be leaders on campus, and do the training to learn how to make this school a safer place," Kevin Reich '14 told The Day.

Camels love Green Dots.

Alia Roth '14 and Darcie Folsom, director of sexual violence prevention and advocacy, recently participated in a roundtable discussion with U.S. Senator Richard Blumenthal. Roth said it is crucial for legislators to hear from students so they can understand student concerns and note the progress student activists are making on their campuses.

The men's hockey team was the first to host a Green Dot game; the women's lacrosse and men's soccer teams now host Green Dot games during the spring and fall seasons.

James O'Connor '15 shows off his Green Dot T-shirt.

Fans cheer on the men's hockey team during the third annual Green Dot game against Tufts University. The Camels won 5-3.

Juniors Winona Mantelli and Kaitlin McDonagh pose in front of the three "Ds" of Green Dot: Direct, Delegate and Distract. The three "Ds" describe ways bystanders can help prevent violence and sexual assault.

On Sunday, 52 students completed Green Dot training, which teaches bystanders how to help prevent sexual assault and violence. More than 500 students, faculty and staff members have now been trained in the Green Dot program.

Emily Goldstein '14 (left), Greg Liautaud '17 (center) and Tim DiPretoro '16 discuss how they would handle a particular situation as part of their Green Dot training Sunday.

Students participate in a group activity as part of Green Dot training Sunday. "Green Dot is about changing the culture, so students feel empowered to do something when they see warning signs that a friend or fellow student may need help," said Darcie Folsom, director of sexual violence prevention and advocacy.

Arely Gaytan '16 (second from left), Dakota Peschel '15 (center) and Chris May '14 complete Green Dot training Sunday.

Seniors Elena Rosario (far left), Katie Pearson (center) and Mackenzie Jackson advocate for Green Dots -- any behavior, choice, word or attitude that counters or displaces a red dot of violence. What's your Green Dot?

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